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If Bears Are Serious About Making Playoffs, They Have to Stick with McCown

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Nov 17, 2013; Chicago, IL, USA; Chicago Bears injured quarterback Jay Cutler (left) looks on as quarterback Josh McCown (12) warms up before the game against the Baltimore Ravens at Soldier Field. Mandatory Credit: Rob Grabowski-USA TODAY Sports

The Bears have been coy about Jay Cutler’s status ever since he returned prematurely for the Detroit Lions game with a torn groin.  (It still hurts to write that).  Whether he reaggravated the groin or suffered a high ankle sprain, he hasn’t been able to get himself back on the field for the last few weeks.  Over the last couple of seasons, that was a death knell for the Bears season, another playoff-less season.  This season, something different is happening.  The Bears might very well miss the playoffs, but it won’t be because of what is going on under center.  Josh McCown has not just survived in replacing Cutler, he’s thrived.

For years, the backup quarterback was the most popular player on the Bears roster.  Ever since Jim McMahon’s days, Bears fans were always looking for the next guy to take the place of the current underachiever that was getting trotted out there.

When the Bears traded for Cutler in 2009, that was quelled for a little bit.  But the quarterback controversy is alive in well in Chicago, with Bears fans clamoring for McCown and pushing the most accomplished passer in their history out the door.

There is no quarterback controversy in the Bears locker room, with everyone from McCown to Trestman to the water boy citing, in Lovie Smith monotone , ”Jay is our quarterback.”

The 2013 season looked like everything was finally coming up aces for Cutler – a new quarterback-friendly, offensive minded head coach, a rebuilt offensive line, a pass catching tight end and more weapons than ever.  Yet it hasn’t happened for Cutler, this time his crucial “make or break” season upended thanks to a couple of injuries that have kept him off the field.   

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Topics: Chicago Bears, Jay Cutler, Josh McCown, Marc Trestman

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  • John Wire

    What I would do it Start McCown, and when he is hurt sometime in the next few games, Jay can come in and be the hero. If it works we can have Cutler start next season and we have McCown backup just like this year. With injuries healed and new acquisitions in the off season, the Bears can make a serious run at the Super Bowl NEXT year.

  • John Mack

    Arm strength does not equate to synergy, rhythm, timing, pocket presence, field vision, etc. I appreciate what Jay has done in Chicago (taking beatings behind less than stellar offensive lines) but part of the reason he was “Mr. 4th Quarter” earlier in the season was offensive sluggishness and ineptitude (coaching, players in a new system and himself all get blame)! I know McCown isn’t the future, but RIDE THE HOT HAND in December! The Lions will falter! Draft a QB in one of the next two drafts (Central Florida’s Blake Bortles deserves a look – yes I’m a homer on that pick)! Again, I know Jay has the stronger arm which we call can see, but I’ll take football intelligence over a canon in this case. If the defense was at least a top 17-19 defense wouldn’t McCown be 4-1 as opposed to 3-2?

  • Sammy Z

    ride McCown, resign Cutler then trade him and draft a QB.

  • Goodshepherd Americanbullies

    Let Cutler ride & spend a bunch of $$ getting the defense back right. Draft a QB to sit behind McCown for a year. If our Defense can get anywhere near where it was McCown will be sufficient enough for next year. We can sign 2 high quality defenders for same price as Cutler & Mel Tucker is actually a good Defensive Coordinator

  • Dr. Johnny Nacho

    I agree, ride the hot hand. Cutler will most certainly have timing issues and general rust and stiffness not being on the field for the past month.

  • Michael Praser

    This isn’t Rex Grossman vs Kyle Orton. Why is everybody acting like it is?