Chicago Bears add return weapon Kerrith Whyte

BOCA RATON, FL - NOVEMBER 24: Kerrith Whyte Jr. #6 of the Florida Atlantic Owls runs for a touchdown against the Charlotte 49ers on the first offensive play of the game on November 24, 2018 at FAU Stadium in Boca Raton, Florida. (Photo by Joel Auerbach/Getty Images)
BOCA RATON, FL - NOVEMBER 24: Kerrith Whyte Jr. #6 of the Florida Atlantic Owls runs for a touchdown against the Charlotte 49ers on the first offensive play of the game on November 24, 2018 at FAU Stadium in Boca Raton, Florida. (Photo by Joel Auerbach/Getty Images) /
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The Chicago Bears added a second running back in the seventh round pick Kerrith Whyte

Before the draft many tied the Chicago Bears to running back Devin Singletary from Florida Atlantic. However, it was his backup from FAU, Kerrith Whyte who turned out to be the pick heading to Chicago to join David Montgomery.

Whyte is going to compete with Montgomery, and Mike Davis and Tarik Cohen. However, as a backup to Devin Singletary, a third-round pick himself, it is clear that Whyte may not have the most upside in the NFL. However, Whyte has a clear role in the NFL.

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Kerrith Whyte was a lethal returner for Florida Atlantic. He only had two kickoff returns for a touchdown but was consistent in how well he was able to set his team up with field position.

Whyte averaged 25.7, 24.7 and 28.7 yards per return in his three years as a returner. In today’s NFL, you need to get the ball out to the 25 to make it worth taking out of the endzone. Whyte has shown that 25 is about the average of what he can do, so if the ball does not go into the end zone, they are gaining field position.

This is an interesting add because the Bears also added Cordarelle Patterson this offseason with the intentions that he can return kicks in a big way. Patterson also can play wide receiver and running back, and Whyte may just be looked at as a Patterson safety blanket. He can do similar things with the ball in his hands on offense, and averaged 16 yards per catch last season, albeit on 10 receptions.

Whyte is an offensive weapon with return game ability. Whether he is injury insurance for Patterson or a weapon to add next to Patterson, he brings more versatility, and we know Matt Nagy loves that.